Pastor's Message

 

Dear Parishioners and friends,

 

Peace and blessings!

 

Today at the 11:30 Mass we will celebrate with those couples having special wedding anniversaries, namely, 25th, 40th, 50th and more. Please keep all our anniversary couples in your prayers.
Wednesday, February 14th, is St. Valentine Day and we will put that aside to begin the season of Lent with Ash Wednesday. Please see the bulletin, website and Facebook page for a listing of the various activities happening here during Lent: Masses, Stations, Penance Services.

 

Something new: as you leave the chapel downstairs there is a bulletin board on the left by the outside door that will post any upcoming funerals of parishioners.

 

Did you know? After the Eucharistic Prayer and Great Amen the Rite of Peace follows. The celebrant prays that the peace of Christ will fill our hearts, our families, our Church, our communities, and our world. As a sign of hope, the people extend to those around them a sign of peace, typically by shaking hands. Great practice to share your name as well. As always, use common sense during the cold and flu season or if you have a cold.

 

Have a blest week.

 

In His peace,

 

Fr. Martin

 

Dear Parishioners and friends,

 

Peace and blessings!

 

Because this weekend will be the “kick off” of DSA, our guest preacher, Deacon Bill Hampton, will not be with us.
February 11th at the 11:30 Mass we will celebrate with those couples having special wedding anniversaries, namely, 25th, 40th, 50th and more. They will all renew their vows at this Mass. Join us and celebrate the Sacrament of Marriage!

 

On Wednesday, February 14th, St. Valentine Day, we will put that aside and begin the season of Lent with Ash Wednesday. Please see the bulletin, website and Facebook page for a listing of the various activities happening here during Lent: Masses, Stations, Penance Services.

 

Did you know? The Communion Rite follows the Eucharistic Prayer, leading us to the Eucharistic table. The rite begins with the Lord's Prayer. Jesus taught this prayer to his disciples when they asked how to pray (cf. Mt 6:9-13, Lk 11:2-4). In this prayer, the people join their voices to pray for the coming of God's kingdom and to ask God to provide for our needs, forgive our sins, and bring us to the joy of heaven.

 

Have a blest week.

 

 

In His peace,

 

Fr. Martin

 

Dear Parishioners and friends,

 

Peace and blessings!

 

We welcome Fr. Remo, our Provincial Minister, to the parish this weekend.

 

Catholic School Week begins on Saturday at our 5:00 Mass. There are a number of activities planned for the week. To learn more about Immaculata School, call the school office. The number is on the cover of the bulletin.

 

Next weekend we will have Deacon Bill Hampton from the Archdiocese of Atlanta preaching at our English Masses. Saturday morning, he is giving a reflection day to the deacons in the Charlotte Diocese.

 

Did you know? There are intercessions in the Eucharistic Prayer. Confident in God's loving care, we make this sacrifice on behalf of the living and the dead, for the leaders of the Church and for all the faithful.
The Eucharistic Prayer concludes with the Final Doxology. The celebrant makes the prayer through, in, and with Jesus, in union with the Holy Spirit, and presents it to God the Father. The people respond with the Great Amen, a joyous affirmation of their faith and participation in this great sacrifice of praise.

 

Have a blest week.

 

In His peace,

 

Fr. Martin

 

Dear Parishioners and friends,


Peace and blessings!


A Unity Service during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity will be January 24th here at Immaculate Conception with our friends from Grace Lutheran Church and any other churches that wish to join us. The service will be at 7:00pm.


On Friday, Jan. 26 we will welcome our Minister Provincial, Fr. Remo DiSalvatore, who will be with us through Monday for our annual Visitation.


Did you know? The next part of the Eucharistic Prayer is the offering. In this part of the prayer, the priest joins the offering of this Mass to the perfect sacrifice that Jesus made on the cross. The priest offers this sacrifice back to God the Father in thanksgiving for God's abundant gifts, particularly the gift of salvation in Christ. The priest also prays that the Holy Spirit may come upon the faithful and by receiving the body and blood of Christ, they themselves may become a living offering to God.


Have a blest week.


In His peace,


Fr. Martin

Dear friends;

 

We begin a new year and the church in its wisdom strips us of the outer layers that we accumulate over time and invites us to focus on the essentials, beginning with the example set forth by the Holy Family and in particular, Mary. We notice that God above all is the giver of gifts, yet in last week’s gospel we hear of Jesus being the receiver of three particular gifts. In conversation with our children in faith formation we notice that these three mysterious gifts reveal to us something beyond the evident. What do they tell us about the nature of this child? The gold speaks to us of the riches that are due to a king; the incense lets us know that Jesus is God since we offer him our prayers that rise up to heaven; myrrh is a type of oil used to prepare bodies for burial. Will Jesus die? What does this tell us about him? This is where the conversation got very interesting. One boy said that it tells us that Jesus is mortal too. Can Jesus be God and human? “He is certainly not a demi-god like the Greeks,” says another. “I don’t get it,” mutters a third. How can he be God and Human?

 

Athanasius reminds us that Jesus became human that we may become divine. Can we? Says another. Can we become divine?

 

Blessings,

 

Claudia